ARTbus: Exhibition tour
Sunday 22 January 2017

Mercer Union, the Art Gallery of York University and Oakville Galleries

Program Description

Exhibition tour to Mercer Union, the Art Gallery of York University and Oakville Galleries

Sunday 22 January 2017, 12:00 pm–5:00 pm
Pick-up and drop-off at Mercer Union (1286 Bloor Street West, Toronto)
$10 donation includes transportation to all galleries and afternoon refreshments

Ride the ARTbus and discover some of the winter's best exhibitions in the GTA!



Mercer Union

The winter ARTbus begins at Mercer Union, with a tour of Astral Bodies by curator York Lethbridge. The exhibition brings together works that imagine spaces beyond the physical—emotional, mythological, cosmological—tracing efforts to understand the nature of divinity and how we fit into the universe. In works that span drawing, sculpture, and video, these artists court intoxicating historical visions that haunt modern imagination in our perpetual quest for knowledge and enlightenment. Here, the night sky recreated with candle flame, hypnotic swirls of human ash, and daydreams on eternity evoke personal positions in relation to the vastness of the world. They also offer fantastical reflections on the juncture between reason and dreams, existing at the meeting point of perception, awareness and philosophy. In the context of Astral Bodies, this assembly of viewpoints results in an exploration of contemporary Western pathologies, contradictions, and anxieties about what lies beyond our immediate reality. Featuring work by Shuvinai Ashoona, Karen Azoulay, Shary Boyle, Spring Hurlbut, and Pamela Norrish.

Art Gallery of York University

At the Art Gallery of York University, the ARTbus will visit Illusion of Process. It seems as though we inhabit a never-ending construction site. Our cities are in a constant state of (re)building, as are the artists that inhabit them. Maggie Groat, Miles Collyer, and Marvin Luvualu Antonio's work draws upon different source material and techniques—from actual concrete to the concretization of concepts and beliefs, for instance—their work does share a strategy. Even as an illusion of process, all artists draw upon the construction site in order to mine the site's philosophical potential, liberating it from the profane cycle of the commodity and inventing it anew on its (and their) own terms. In this exhibition, as in the artists' work, the abstract collection of matter and objects are transformed through use and proximity, articulating the complexities of built space and the never-ending construction of meaning. Political discourse is inherent in all three artists' work without the articulation of overt narratives, allowing the power of the conditional material to do the heavy lifting.

Oakville Galleries

Next, at Oakville Galleries at Centennial Square, visit the opening of Les Levine: Transmedia guest-curated by Sarah Robayo Sheridan. Charting the significant influence of Irish-Canadian artist Les Levine, this exhibition brings together a selection of works made adjacent to the multimedia artist's time in Toronto, ranging from the mid-1960s to the early 1970s. This project will feature works in sound, sculpture, painting, and other media, exemplifying what a key creative actor Levine was and measuring his prescient innovations against what are now highly relevant contemporary art preoccupations such as institutional critique, the adaptation of new technologies in the creative process and environmental artworks. This project is funded in part by the Government of Canada.

Finally, at Oakville Galleries in Gairloch Gardens visit the opening of Etel Adnan: Sea and Fog. Born in Beirut in 1925, Etel Adnan is a painter, essayist, and poet. Since the 1960s, she has been known for her influential writing, particularly the award-winning 1978 novel Sitt Marie Rose. In recent years, Adnan's work as a visual artist has been the subject of increased attention, with her astute use of colour and compelling semi-abstract forms being taken up widely. For her first solo exhibition in Canada, Adnan will present a series of recent works at Oakville Galleries in Gairloch Gardens, including a selection of paintings, alongside prints, leporelli, tapestries, and film. Read together, these works demonstrate the rich breadth of this extraordinary artist's practice and her career-long meditation on landscapes and the natural world.

Program Details

Time

12:00 pm: Mercer Union. Tour of Astral Bodies with the curator York Lethbridge.

1:15 pm: Art Gallery of York University. Visit Illusion of Process.

2:45 pm: Oakville Galleries at Centennial Square. Visit opening of Les Levine: Transmedia.

3:30 pm: Oakville Galleries in Gairloch Gardens. Visit Etel Adnan: Sea and Fog. Opening reception with refreshments.

5:00 pm: Drop-off at Mercer Union.

Location

Mercer Union
1286 Bloor Street West, Toronto
416.536.1519
www.mercerunion.org

Art Gallery of York University
Accolade East Building, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto
416.736.5169
www.theAGYUisOutThere.org

Oakville Galleries
Oakville Galleries at Centennial Square: 120 Navy St, Oakville
Oakville Galleries in Gairloch Gardens: 1306 Lakeshore Road East, Oakville
905.844.4402
www.oakvillegalleries.com

Images (clockwise from top left): Installation view of Astral Bodies at Mercer Union, 2016. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid; Illusion of Process. Photo: Michael Maranda; Studio shot of Les Levine, 1964. Photo: John Reeves; Etel Adan, Sans titre, 2014, oil on canvas. Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Lelong, Paris.

Related Exhibitions

Etel Adnan

Oakville Galleries in Gairloch Gardens

Born in Beirut in 1925, Etel Adnan is a painter, essayist, and poet. For her first solo exhibition in Canada, Adnan will present a series of recent works at Oakville Galleries, including a selection of paintings, alongside prints, leporelli and tapestries.

Learn more

Les Levine

Oakville Galleries at Centennial Square

Charting the significant influence of Irish-Canadian-American artist Les Levine, this exhibition brings together a selection of works made adjacent to the multimedia artist's time in Toronto, ranging from the mid-1960s to the early 1970s.

Learn more